Taking a Drive

Yesterday I decided to take a drive in the mountains near where I live. I’m sure to most they are only foothills, but to us they are our mountains. A little back story to my post.

Years ago on a dirt bike ride we visited a abandon cemetery on an old dirt road in the mountains. I can remember the majority of those buried there had died the same year. I can also remember a swimming hole in the stream next to the cemetery. Now fast forward to about 10 years ago I started looking for this cemetery again. Well I’m still looking.

Every now and then I take a drive find another old back road that I haven’t tried yet and see if I can find that cemetery and swimming hole. And sad to say yesterday was not the day. But, I had a great time exploring yet another old dirt road.

A winding road in Forbes State Forest, Fayette County, Pennsylvania.

Covered Bridges

So there is a bunch of different theories about why covered bridges were originally built.  Some say it was to keep the horses from getting spooked when they crossed.  Some say it was to provide shelter for those that got caught out in the weather.  But most likely they were covered to protect the massive wooden trusses that held the bridges together.  Adding the covering would increase the life of the bridge by as much as three times.

What ever the reason for the covered bridge, it most certainly has given us some beautiful sights to see out in the country side.  I’m lucky enough to live in an area where there are several bridges that have been preserved and today a few of photographed three of the local bridges.  Hope you enjoy the bridges as much as we did.

Kings Covered Bridge first built 1806.

Kings Covered Bridge 1802

The King’s Bridge is a historic covered bridge in Middlecreek TownshipSomerset County, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1806, and is a 127-foot-4-inch-long (38.81 m) Burr truss bridge, with an asbestos covered gable roof. The bridge crosses Laurel Hill Creek. It is one of 10 covered bridges in Somerset County.[2]

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.  Info from Wikipedia

Barronvale Bridge first built 1902.

Barronvale Bridge 1830

The Barronvale Bridge, also known as Barron’s Mill Bridge, is a historic covered bridge at Middlecreek Township, in Somerset County, Pennsylvania crossing Laurel Hill Creek. At 162 feet 3 inches (49.45 m) it is the longest remaining covered bridge in Somerset County. It is 13 feet 10 inches (4.22 m) wide. The Burr truss bridge was built in 1902, and is one of 10 covered bridges in Somerset County.[2][3] Info from Wikipedia

Lower Humbert Covered Bridge built 1891.

Humbert Covered Bridge

The Lower Humbert Covered Bridge, or the Faidley Covered Bridge, is an 126-foot-6-inch (38.56 m) Burr Arch truss covered bridge that crosses Laurel Hill Creek, in Lower Turkeyfoot TownshipSomerset County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It was built in 1891 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 10, 1980.[2] It is one of the ten remaining covered bridges in Somerset County.  Info from Wikipedia.

The Tower of Oakland

Tonight I’m posting a couple of shots of a tower in Oakland, Pa.  This is near Heinz Chapel in Pittsburgh.  I found this building to be interesting as it seems a little out-of-place next to the modern building.  I don’t know what the building is or what it is used for, I just find it fascinating.

If you have any information about the building I would like to know a little more about it.

Tower 1 Tower

Out for a Ride

As I sit here and glance over at the thermometer it currently reads 25 degrees and falling.  So continuing with the “I wish it was warmer” theme.  I’m posting a photo I took this past summer in Ohiopyle State Park.  For this shot I used a D300 and a fisheye lens.  I then made adjustments in Lightroom 4 and Photoshop.

So here’s to warmer weather, bicycle rides, and relaxing in the sun.

Out for a Ride

The Nations Cemetery

Todays photos are from Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Va.  If you ever have the opportunity to visit I highly recommend taking the time to see this hallowed ground.  These photos are from inside the Memorial Amphitheater using a fisheye lens.

Hope you enjoy!

theater 2 theater

Pittsburgh, My Home Away From Home

As you can guess tonights post is about Pittsburgh, Pa.  Growing up I can remember going to the city for special events like the circus and monster truck races at the Civic Arena.  Going to the museums and one of my favorite places Phipps Conservatory.  I can remember going to Mt. Washington too see the city scape and especially at night to see the lights from so high above the city.

Well I’m all grown now and I travel to the city just about everyday and it still mesmerizes me every single day.  There are truly no two days alike and the city is constantly changing, growing and evolving.  I’ve spent the better part of the last two years in Pittsburgh and I can say that I see something unique everyday.  If you live or work in any city take time everyday to look around and see what amazing things the city has to offer.  All to often we get in a rut and don’t see the great things right in front of us, because we are always looking forward to the next “BIG” thing.

Today was one of the rare occasions that I got off work early enough to run up to Mt. Washington and see those amazing lights once again.  And I would like to share the following two photographs with you.  Leave a comment and tell me what amazes you about the city or town you live or work in.

City of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Skyline

A Walk Through the Garden….

Recently I had a little free time and decided to stop by the outdoor gardens at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. The inside always proves to have great flowers, patterns, and details to photograph.  In my opinion the outside has some very interesting things to photograph as well.  Included are just a few shots from the walk but I think I was able to come up with a few interesting photos.

If you in the area I would recommend stopping by and taking a walk around the outside of the building.  The best part is that there is no charge to visit the outside gardens.