48 of 366

A charming field for an encounter….

“A charming field for an encounter” was in part the description that the young Lt. Col. George Washington wrote to Governor Dinwiddie in May of 1754 of the Great Meadows that he had chosen for his base camp. Little did he know, that in just a few short months, he would in fact be signing his surrender to the French Army, at what has become know as the Battle of Fort Necessity. Before we get to the photos I want to give you a brief account of the events that lead to the battle and ultimately the surrender at the fort.

In May of 1754 Washington had arrived at the Great Meadows and decided to make them his base camp for his operations. He was working on clearing a road now know as the National Road. Shortly after arriving and setting up camp Washington became aware of a group of French soldiers that were encamped in a ravine not far away. Washington decided to confront them and find out their intentions. After an all night march in bad weather Washington and his men arrived and surrounded the French soldiers. Now, no one really know the exact circumstances that follows but a shot was fired resulting in a skirmish that lasted for about 15 minutes and 13 Frenchman dead and 21 captured. One had escaped and made his way back to Fort Duquesne. This skirmish was at what would be later named Jumonville Glen after the leader of the French detachment who was killed during the skirmish.

After this skirmish Washington feared an attack and built what we know know as Fort Necessity in 5 days at the end of May and the first of June. He was correct and on July 3, 1754 Washington met with a French army of 600 men and about 100 Indians. After fighting throughout the day in a bad rain storm and considerable losses to Washington’s troops. George Washington signed the terms of surrender. The British were allowed to retreat with the honors of war, but Washington did have to surrender his command to the French. Due to a bad translation of the documents Washington was unaware of the fact the he had also signed his name to a confession of the “assignation” of the French officer Jumonville and the French would use this as part of their propaganda for the resulting French and Indian War.

This battle is considered the beginning of the French and Indian war as well as the beginning of the the Seven Year War which took place in many countries throughout the world. It also helped to set the events in order that would result in the American Revolutionary War.

48-365

48.1/365

48.2/365

48.3/365

48.4/365

48.5/365

Old Bedford Village – French & Indian War Reenactment

Here are a few of the shots that I took on my trip to Old Bedford Village on Sunday.  They were having a reenactment and living history program on the French & Indian War.  The weather wasn’t the greatest but I managed to have a good time and come away with some photos.

Hope you Enjoy!

3 Pounder 3 Shots A Stroll Through Camp French Battle From the Muzzle Old Bedford Reflection

A Few Shots from Gettysburg

Tonight I have a couple of shots that I did on my latest trip to Gettysburg.  If you are able to visit Gettysburg I highly recommend taking the time see what Gettysburg has to offer.  This is an area rich in history and I learn something new every time I visit.  I would also like to point out that this year is the 150th anniversary of the battle and they have many great events planned for the entire year.

Hope you enjoy!

Gettysburg Farm Pennyslvania MonumentGettysburg Cannon

From an Era Long Ago

Tonights post is a couple of photos from a Steam and Gas Engine show that I attend every Year.  The show is called the National Pike Steam, Gas, and Horse Association and they put on one of the largest working show in the United States.  You can actually watch these neat old pieces of equipment running and moving dirt.

Wynns Steam Hubber

150 Years Ago

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.  I have all intentions of making it there this year during the reenactments in July.

These are a couple of the statues on the Confederate side.  The gentleman on the horse is General Grant and the other photo is from Pickett’s Charge.GB Grant

 

Museum Teaser

Tonight’s post is  a teaser for tomorrow nights.  I took a trip to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History today and will be posting the shots tomorrow night but until then enjoy “Chasing Lunch”.

Chasing Lunch

Remembering The Past

For todays post I would like you to think back to when you were a kid and try to remember something that stood out to you. Today, I was close by one of the towns that I grew up in and decided to take a ride down main street.  As I rode down the street I remembered asking  my dad to  ride my bicycle “uptown” to go to the 5 and 10 store for some candy.  At the risk of dating myself I can remember when you could get a bunch of candy for a quarter and imagine how much I was able to get with a dollar and our local 5 and 10 had penny candy.  I now know that this was one of the few places left that was still selling penny candy.  I can remember leaving my bike on the sidewalk, running into the store with my friends and picking our candy.  (there once was a time when you could leave you bike on the sidewalk and it would still be there when you came out) Then my friends and I would ride back home with our brown bags filled with candy.

As I rode through the town today I was amazed at how things have changed and, at the same time, how things have stayed the same.  The 5 and 10 store, although long ago closed, is still standing.  Another place that I remember was the local barber shop.  In this case we are talking about Mr. Ugliks. I can remember sitting there in the yellow chairs that lined the walls listening to all the older men talking about, well just about everything. I think Mr. Uglik spent more time talking than cutting, it was an experience that many will never have.  To this day I can remember the sound that the razor made when he sharpened it on the leather strap hanging from the chair and the feeling of the shaving cream on my neck.  And by-the-way the price for a hair cut was $6 and that included the shave.  But the entertainment was free and priceless.  I have to mention, just in case someone from the area reads this, the one man that was always there, “The Captain”.  If you’ve ever spent any time in Masontown, Pa,  I’m positive you ran into “The Captain” at some point.

So I leave you with this, remember the old times, tell the young people about them, for they are gone and if we don’t share our memories how will they live on?

Some things from the past are worth remembering….

5 and 10 Ugliks Barber Shop