Uniontown A Stop on the National Road

Uniontown, Pa founded on July 4, 1776 by Henry Beeson. In the early part of the 19th century the National Road was routed through Uniontown which allowed the town to grow as the road did.

Over the years Uniontown has played a role in numerous historic events, from being a stop on the underground railroad for slaves fleeing north for their freedom to the violent coal miners strike in 1894 which resulted in five dead and eight wounded.

During the early part of the 20th century, Uniontown was home to more millionaires per capita than any other city in the United States.

From 1916 to 1922 Uniontown was also home to the Uniontown Speedway which was a wooden track over a mile long.

Uniontown was also the birthplace of the Big Mac which I’m sure you all have eaten at least once.

The photos below are from a few places in the city including the Fayette County Courthouse, Elks Lodge, the County Building, and a few other places.

(Information for this post was found on The City of Uniontown page)

WA Young Machine Shop

Visiting places of historical value is something that I enjoy very much in my life. Especially if they are historical to my local area. I’ve visited this place on more than one occasion and feel that it is worth another post.

The WA Young Machine shop was built in 1900 by William A. Young in a little town along the Monongahela River called Rices Landing. In 1908 they added the foundry and in 1928 electricity was added. The foundry and machine shop continued to service the town and steamboats on the river until it’s closure in 1965. They were known for making parts for the boats from scratch utilizing the wood shop to make molds, the foundry to pour the pieces and the machine shop to finish the product. A truly invaluable service along the river for steamboats carrying goods up and down the river.

Today you can visit this machine shop and listen to the stories about the place from the gentleman that keep it going today. (Once we get through the lock down) Take a look at some photos from my last stop and also take a look through my blog for other post about this place.

For more information about the machine shop visit the Rivers of Steel Website here: WA Young Foundry

The Hotel Belvedere

The Hotel Belvedere was built in 1905, by an immigrant from Switzerland, Joseph Gianini. When the hotel was built it was across the railroad tracks from a railroad station.

The hotel originally had a candy store and ice cream parlor on the first floor with the upper floors as the guest rooms. Eventually the first floor turned into a bar and the rooms apartments. In 1979 Lanna Planitzer purchased the hotel with the hopes of restoring it to it’s former self. That having proved to be too much of a financial burden for her. She did however live in the hotel until it was condemned in 2017.

I had the chance to visit the hotel last year not long before the place caught fire and burned to the ground.  I truly wish that we could have seen this place when it was in it’s heyday. I can only imagine how nice the hotel would have been.

Information for this post was found in a post from the Apollo Area Historical Society, for more photos and information please visit their site at: www.apollopahistory.com

A train passes Hotel Belevedere in Apollo, Pa

Hotel Belvedere now lays in dispair.

Hotel Belvedere closed for Business.

48 of 366

A charming field for an encounter….

“A charming field for an encounter” was in part the description that the young Lt. Col. George Washington wrote to Governor Dinwiddie in May of 1754 of the Great Meadows that he had chosen for his base camp. Little did he know, that in just a few short months, he would in fact be signing his surrender to the French Army, at what has become know as the Battle of Fort Necessity. Before we get to the photos I want to give you a brief account of the events that lead to the battle and ultimately the surrender at the fort.

In May of 1754 Washington had arrived at the Great Meadows and decided to make them his base camp for his operations. He was working on clearing a road now know as the National Road. Shortly after arriving and setting up camp Washington became aware of a group of French soldiers that were encamped in a ravine not far away. Washington decided to confront them and find out their intentions. After an all night march in bad weather Washington and his men arrived and surrounded the French soldiers. Now, no one really know the exact circumstances that follows but a shot was fired resulting in a skirmish that lasted for about 15 minutes and 13 Frenchman dead and 21 captured. One had escaped and made his way back to Fort Duquesne. This skirmish was at what would be later named Jumonville Glen after the leader of the French detachment who was killed during the skirmish.

After this skirmish Washington feared an attack and built what we know know as Fort Necessity in 5 days at the end of May and the first of June. He was correct and on July 3, 1754 Washington met with a French army of 600 men and about 100 Indians. After fighting throughout the day in a bad rain storm and considerable losses to Washington’s troops. George Washington signed the terms of surrender. The British were allowed to retreat with the honors of war, but Washington did have to surrender his command to the French. Due to a bad translation of the documents Washington was unaware of the fact the he had also signed his name to a confession of the “assignation” of the French officer Jumonville and the French would use this as part of their propaganda for the resulting French and Indian War.

This battle is considered the beginning of the French and Indian war as well as the beginning of the the Seven Year War which took place in many countries throughout the world. It also helped to set the events in order that would result in the American Revolutionary War.

48-365

48.1/365

48.2/365

48.3/365

48.4/365

48.5/365

Old Bedford Village – French & Indian War Reenactment

Here are a few of the shots that I took on my trip to Old Bedford Village on Sunday.  They were having a reenactment and living history program on the French & Indian War.  The weather wasn’t the greatest but I managed to have a good time and come away with some photos.

Hope you Enjoy!

3 Pounder 3 Shots A Stroll Through Camp French Battle From the Muzzle Old Bedford Reflection

A Few Shots from Gettysburg

Tonight I have a couple of shots that I did on my latest trip to Gettysburg.  If you are able to visit Gettysburg I highly recommend taking the time see what Gettysburg has to offer.  This is an area rich in history and I learn something new every time I visit.  I would also like to point out that this year is the 150th anniversary of the battle and they have many great events planned for the entire year.

Hope you enjoy!

Gettysburg Farm Pennyslvania MonumentGettysburg Cannon

From an Era Long Ago

Tonights post is a couple of photos from a Steam and Gas Engine show that I attend every Year.  The show is called the National Pike Steam, Gas, and Horse Association and they put on one of the largest working show in the United States.  You can actually watch these neat old pieces of equipment running and moving dirt.

Wynns Steam Hubber