Covered Bridges

So there is a bunch of different theories about why covered bridges were originally built.  Some say it was to keep the horses from getting spooked when they crossed.  Some say it was to provide shelter for those that got caught out in the weather.  But most likely they were covered to protect the massive wooden trusses that held the bridges together.  Adding the covering would increase the life of the bridge by as much as three times.

What ever the reason for the covered bridge, it most certainly has given us some beautiful sights to see out in the country side.  I’m lucky enough to live in an area where there are several bridges that have been preserved and today a few of photographed three of the local bridges.  Hope you enjoy the bridges as much as we did.

Kings Covered Bridge first built 1806.

Kings Covered Bridge 1802

The King’s Bridge is a historic covered bridge in Middlecreek TownshipSomerset County, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1806, and is a 127-foot-4-inch-long (38.81 m) Burr truss bridge, with an asbestos covered gable roof. The bridge crosses Laurel Hill Creek. It is one of 10 covered bridges in Somerset County.[2]

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.  Info from Wikipedia

Barronvale Bridge first built 1902.

Barronvale Bridge 1830

The Barronvale Bridge, also known as Barron’s Mill Bridge, is a historic covered bridge at Middlecreek Township, in Somerset County, Pennsylvania crossing Laurel Hill Creek. At 162 feet 3 inches (49.45 m) it is the longest remaining covered bridge in Somerset County. It is 13 feet 10 inches (4.22 m) wide. The Burr truss bridge was built in 1902, and is one of 10 covered bridges in Somerset County.[2][3] Info from Wikipedia

Lower Humbert Covered Bridge built 1891.

Humbert Covered Bridge

The Lower Humbert Covered Bridge, or the Faidley Covered Bridge, is an 126-foot-6-inch (38.56 m) Burr Arch truss covered bridge that crosses Laurel Hill Creek, in Lower Turkeyfoot TownshipSomerset County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It was built in 1891 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 10, 1980.[2] It is one of the ten remaining covered bridges in Somerset County.  Info from Wikipedia.

365 Project | Day 16 Fall Revisited

Todays photo games from a short day trip I made in the fall to a historical landmark in Grantsville, Md.  This was an early boring shot just after day break.  And to me there is just something about that light that made the hour-long drive in the early morning worth it.

Castlemans River Bridge

Castleman's River Bridge