A Quick Trip to Ohio

Recently I took a quick trip to Ohio to visit YM Camera in Boardman. If you haven’t heard of the place or haven’t visited it yet I would highly recommend them. Robbie and the staff are amazing and they really take care of their customers.

So after my visit to YM Camera I visited Lanterman’s Mill Creek Park to photograph Lanterman’s Mill and a covered bridge.

Lanterman’s Mill was built-in 1845-46 and then restored in the early 1980’s. The mill operates today as it did originally grinding corn, wheat, and buckwheat. I was there a little to late in the day to see the mill in operation but I am planning a return visit to tour the inside of the mill.

So here are a few photos of the mill and covered bridge. If your ever in the area I would definitely recommend stopping by both the mill and YM Camera.

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Sometimes I just enjoy taking a ride through the country side. And you never know what you might come across on one of those rides. On this particular ride deep in the woods on a small road I came across an interesting structure that I’m assuming is a spring of some sort. Maybe you can tell me what it is?

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A few days ago I found myself out and about in the mountains. I was driving in the Ohiopyle area and somehow, don’t ask me how, I ended up in Somerset, Pa. On the way home I dropped by the Lower Humbert Bridge. This is a covered bridge built in 1891. Below are three photos from different angles. Hope you enjoy.

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What Lies Beneath

During the summer we all like to enjoy the water and will often stop by a lake to take a swim. While your out having a little fun have you ever considered what might be deep beneath the surface.

Located in southwestern Pennsylvania and western Maryland is the Youghiogheny River Dam which was built to control flooding on the Yough river. In the early 1940’s the town of Somerfield was abandon due to the dam project and subsequently flooded. Leaving behind, Somerfield bridge which was once part of Rt. 40 also know as the National Pike. The bridge was dedicated in 1818 and was used until the flooding. For nearly 50 years the bridge and town remained under the surface of the water forgotten. But, in 1991 the bridge and town reappeared for the first time bringing visitors from all over to see the lost town. And since then in times of drought the lake is drained and the bridge and town reappear for a short time. And you guessed it, the town and bridge has reappeared this year and for a short time we can take a look at the old bridge. So if you have the time take a ride up to the lake and walk across the bridge, that was once part of the National Pike, and the submerged town of Somerfield.

The photos below are of the Somerfield bridge, some of the foundations, and a few other things that lie beneath the surface.

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